A month ago, after four years and a quarter as CTO, I left The New York Times. It was an amazing four years, and I want to take a moment to capture some of what we accomplished, and some of what I learned in the process.

First, I will dearly miss the Times. The opportunity to sit around a table with leaders like Mark Thompson, Meredith Levien, and brilliant journalists like A.G, Dean Baquet, Joe Kahn and James Bennet, has been priceless.

It was quite a ride. We went from 1 million to 5 million digital subscribers, really turning the…


Illustrations by Alfonso de Anda

By NICK ROCKWELL and CHRIS WIGGINS

This post also appeared in Times Open.

Carlos A. Gomez-Uribe is the former Vice President of Product Innovation at Netflix, where he oversaw algorithm development for movie recommendations and search. New York Times CTO, Nick Rockwell, and Chief Data Scientist, Chris Wiggins, spoke to Gomez-Uribe about his career, the evolution of machine learning at Netflix, and how companies should be very thoughtful about how they integrates machine learning into products. The following has been edited and condensed.

Q. How did you come to work in Product at Netflix? Do you think it’s important for…


Illustrations by Danielle Chenette

Debbie Madden is the founder and CEO of Stride Consulting and author of the book, “Hire Women.” After the revelation that she was not being paid fairly in one of her first jobs, she vowed to spend her career ensuring that every team she worked on had equal pay. Her book combines her leadership experience with a framework for creating diverse and supportive workplaces.

We talked about how difficult it can be to achieve pay equity, why it’s important to have a diverse team, how to be a better leader and what the future might hold. This Q. & A…


Illustration by Joey Yu

Artur Bergman is the Founder and CEO of Fastly, a cloud computing services provider. I spoke with Artur about building Fastly on open source technology, why early internet protocol design could have benefited from more diverse contributors and how the speed of light kind of pisses him off. Editor’s note: The New York Times uses Fastly in our technology infrastructure.

Q: One of the things I admire about Fastly is that from the beginning, you went straight at a powerful, entrenched incumbent with a long track record of crushing upstart rivals through various means. And, you did it with nothing…


Illustrations by James Clapham

For this installment of Talking Technology, I interviewed Bill Magnuson, co-founder and CEO of Braze.

You’re 31-years-old and the cofounder and CEO of a successful tech startup — can you talk a little about your journey to get here?

I grew up in Minnesota, always loved technology and ended up going to MIT for Computer Science. I graduated in the spring of 2009, just as Android was starting to gain steam, and joined a team in Google Research that was building a visual programming language for Android applications called App Inventor. …


Illustration by Min Heo

For this installment of Talking Technology, I interviewed The Ready founder Aaron Dignan and early employee, Spencer Pitman.

Tell us a bit about yourselves and The Ready. What are you guys up to, and why?

Aaron: I’ve spent my career looking for the most interesting problem, whatever that might be. That led to years exploring disruptive and exponential technology. But after a decade of that work, I realized that the technology wasn’t the problem, it was our ability to metabolize change. Despite the best of intentions, nearly every organization becomes a stifling bureaucracy over time. I became obsessed with organizational…


Cindy Taibi

I couldn’t be more pleased to announce that I have promoted Cindy Taibi to Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer of The New York Times. It’s a little unusual for us to post a promotion announcement on Times Open, but I think that this one is special and I couldn’t resist.

For us at The Times, this is a very exciting moment. As a 37-year veteran of The Times, Cindy embodies the values the institution. She has worked across the company in a variety of roles: as a developer in our core print News Systems group; overseeing I.T. for…


Illustration by Simone Noronha

Scott Belsky is the founder of Behance and 99U, and currently the Chief Product Officer for Creative Cloud at Adobe. He is also a frequent investor, a great writer and an all-around fun guy. Scott, thanks for contributing!

You built a great product for designers in Behance, created one of the leading design conferences in 99U, and have focused on the contribution of design to entrepreneurship and product development; yet, you are not trained as a designer. Where does your affinity for, and understanding of, the role and centrality of design come from? While I first used Adobe Illustrator and…


Illustration by Jenice Kim

For this installment of Open Questions, I interviewed Wherewithall co-founder and coach Lara Hogan about her work in technology, managing technologists and “roaming the wilds” as a consultant.

Q. Do you think managing technical people is different from managing people from other backgrounds or with other skills?


Illustration by Andrei Kallaur/The New York Times

This is the first in a series where New York Times CTO, Nick Rockwell, talks to leaders in the technology world about their work. Rockwell interviewed Charity Majors, the co-founder and CEO of Honeycomb, about observability software, debugging and “getting inside the software’s head.”

Nick Rockwell: Can you give us some background about the problems you’re trying to solve with Honeycomb?

Charity Majors: The market is saturated with monitoring startups, logging startups, analytics startups and APM (Application Performance Management). There are so many startups, it shows people aren’t terribly happy with the options available to them. And yet, the newer…

Nick Rockwell

SVP Engineering at Fastly, ex-CTO at NYT. Passionate about tech, music, science, art, helping others be their best.

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